Stacking the Shelves #125

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Stacking the Shelves is a meme hosted by Tynga’s Reviews

The Green Muse (Edouard Mas, 1) – Jessie Prichard Hunter

In Belle Époque Paris, the morgue is the place to see and be seen …

« This morning I was called upon to photograph the dead again. » So begins the story of Edouard Mas, a photographer’s assistant with a detective’s soul. Edouard’s job is to take pictures of corpses before they are carted off to the Paris Morgue. If the bodies are unidentified, they will be put behind glass for the whole city to view, in a morbid display of lost and found.

Edouard begins to come across more and more bodies stripped of their identification and laid out in methodical poses, and he knows he is dealing with those who dabble in art—the art of death. The morgue—their museum.

Edouard’s investigation takes him from the sterile halls of La Salpêtrière to the opulent, smoke-filled soirees of high society, but he must do everything in his power to stop the artists of death, before they go after somebody he loves …

In exquisite prose—so vivid you can almost taste the absinthe and hear the rustling skirts of the Moulin Rouge showgirls—Hunter tells an unforgettable tale of murder and lust in the City of Light.

The Wicked City (Siren Song, 1) – Megan Morgan

Whatever June Coffin says, goes—literally. And it’s not just because she’s a chain smoking rebel. As a Siren, June has the ability to force people to obey any command she voices. But in a world where those with supernatural powers quickly become lab rats for science, she’d rather look out for herself than fight on the front lines…until her similarly gifted twin brother, Jason, is captured by Chicago’s Institute of Supernatural Research.

To save Jason, June has no choice but to enter a hidden world of conspiracy, murder—and strange bedfellows—including a widowed paranormal advocate whose memory June accidentally erased, and a fiery paranormal separatist leader. Soon the lines between attraction and strategic alliance become blurred. But in a city exploding with paranormal crossfire, and her brother’s life at stake, June will have to face her inner demons and finally take a stand.

One Kiss More (U.S. Marshals, 2) – Mandy Baxter

Emma Ruiz knows her father is innocent. But that doesn’t help her convince the law—not even smoking hot U.S. Marshal Landon McCabe. When McCabe bangs on her door demanding information about how her cancer-stricken father escaped from federal prison, she’ll have to distract him somehow—it may as well be with a stolen kiss.

Landon gets why Emma isn’t saying all she knows. What he doesn’t understand is why he’s putting his reputation, his case, and his badge on the line for a gorgeous person of interest. Much as he’d love to, he can’t let Emma play him. The stakes are higher than either of them can guess. The only way to survive is to trust their instincts. But their instincts want more than one kiss…

White Knight (Cornerstone Run Trilogy, 3) – Kelly Meade

Despite a month of peace from hybrid attacks, the constant threat of violence has the loup garou on edge. Knight McQueen’s home feels like a military compound and his people have become battle-weary soldiers. And Knight’s tenuous grip on his own self-control has been further damaged by the disappearance of the only woman whose touch brings him peace.

Held prisoner by her hybrid half-sisters and forced to care for an unknown child, Shay Butler’s quarterly is approaching but a silver-laced collar prevents her from shifting. As her time draws closer, her sanity begins to slip.

The opportunity to rescue Shay arrives when Magus enemy Archimedes Atwood requests a parley to discuss ways to end the conflict between their people and stop the rogue hybrids. Alpha Bishop McQueen agrees, bringing his brothers together to form a plan that will bring Shay home to Knight, stop the final two hybrids—and finally bring Archimedes to justice once and for all…

Merci à ma soeur :

On the Edge (The Edge, 1) – Ilona Andrews

Rose Drayton lives on the Edge, between the world of the Broken (where people drive cars, shop at Wal-Mart, and magic is a fairy tale) and the Weird (where blueblood aristocrats rule, changelings roam, and the strength of your magic can change your destiny). Only Edgers like Rose can easily travel from one world to the next, but they never truly belong in either.

Rose thought if she practiced her magic, she could build a better life for herself. But things didn’t turn out how she planned, and now she works a minimum wage, off the books job in the Broken just to survive. Then Declan Camarine, a blueblood noble straight out of the deepest part of the Weird, comes into her life, determined to have her (and her power).

But when a terrible danger invades the Edge from the Weird, a flood of creatures hungry for magic, Declan and Rose must work together to destroy them—or they’ll devour the Edge and everyone in it.

Merci à l’adorable Céline :

City of Bones (The Mortal Instruments, 1) – Cassandra Clare

When fifteen-year-old Clary Fray heads out to the Pandemonium Club in New York City, she hardly expects to witness a murder― much less a murder committed by three teenagers covered with strange tattoos and brandishing bizarre weapons. Then the body disappears into thin air. It’s hard to call the police when the murderers are invisible to everyone else and when there is nothing―not even a smear of blood―to show that a boy has died. Or was he a boy?

This is Clary’s first meeting with the Shadowhunters, warriors dedicated to ridding the earth of demons. It’s also her first encounter with Jace, a Shadowhunter who looks a little like an angel and acts a lot like a jerk. Within twenty-four hours Clary is pulled into Jace’s world with a vengeance, when her mother disappears and Clary herself is attacked by a demon. But why would demons be interested in ordinary mundanes like Clary and her mother? And how did Clary suddenly get the Sight? The Shadowhunters would like to know…

Exotic and gritty, exhilarating and utterly gripping, Cassandra Clare’s ferociously entertaining fantasy takes readers on a wild ride that they will never want to end.

Monsieur Ibrahim et les fleurs du Coran – Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt

Paris, dans les années 1960.
Momo, garçon juif de 12 ans, mal aimé, vit seul avec son père. Ibrahim, le vieux sage, tient une épicerie arabe. Un jour, leurs regards se croisent… Ce texte, qui a fait l’objet d’une adaptation cinématographique magistrale de François Dupeyron, est le lieu d’une réflexion sur l’amitié, la force de vivre, la rencontre, les sources de tolérance. Fable, conte, voyage initiatique, Monsieur Ibrahim et les Fleurs du Coran propose aussi un travail sur l’art et les fonctions du dialogue dans le récit. L’appareil pédagogique est suivi d’une interview exclusive de l’auteur.

mellianefini

31 thoughts on “Stacking the Shelves #125

  1. I’m really interested in The Green Muse and The Wicked City.

    OMG. You will read City of Bones? Heeee. so excited for you! I hope you’ll enjoy! Book one was great but, no worries, the sequels will not dissappoint either 😀 And then you can read Infernal Devices too, heh <3

  2. J’ai lu très récemment « Monsieur Ibrahim et les fleurs du Coran » d’Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt, c’est une histoire touchante et chargée de tolérance, et ça fait du bien !!!

  3. Oh I like the looks of Wild City. And I hope you enjoy City of Bones. 🙂 I want to try Kelly Meades books, but…well you know. 😉 Have a great week.

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